Traffic Violations/Tickets- FAQ's

SITE MAP   CONTACT US

 
 


The following are frequently asked questions concerning traffic violations -
THEY ARE NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR LEGAL ADVICE FROM YOUR OWN ATTORNEY

 

 

Circuit Clerk
Terri Reynolds

County Courthouse,
1st Floor
501 Archer
Marshall, IL 62441

Phone
(217) 826-2811
 
 

 

State's Attorney
Dennis Simonton

2nd Floor, Courthouse
501 Archer
Marshall, IL 62441

Phone
(217) 826-6142
Fax
(217) 826-5674

 

 

  • What is the status of my case? When is my next court date?
       You may find information about your case online at:
    www.judici.com
     
  • Do I need an attorney for my case?
      Receiving a traffic ticket is always an unpleasant experience and if you are unfamiliar with the court system, trying to resolve a traffic ticket can be confusing and stressful. For this reason, many people choose to have an attorney represent them in their traffic cases. The decision to hire an attorney is entirely your own.
      Depending on the type of offense you are charged with, you may have the right to an attorney appointed for you by the court if you cannot afford one of your own. If you do have such a right, the judge will explain it to you when you come to court.
     
  • Can I ask an attorney from the State's Attorney's office for advice?
       Attorney's from the Clark County's State's Attorney's office are responsible for prosecuting all traffic tickets issued within the county. Because these attorneys represent the people of the State of Illinois as a whole, they are legally prohibited from giving legal advice to people charged with crimes - even those charged with minor traffic offenses. Furthermore, because attorneys working for the State's Attorney's office are the ones assigned to prosecute you case, anything you tell them could be used in court. Your best option is to consult your own attorney.
     
  • Do I need to appear in court for my ticket?
      Some traffic tickets do not require a court appearance. Take a careful look at the bottom of your ticket to determine whether you need to appear in court at all. Many minor tickets may be marked, "No court appearance required." If your ticket is marked, "Court appearance required," then you must appear on the date indicated on your ticket.
     
  • I just want to pay my ticket. What do I need to do?
      If your ticket is marked "No appearance required," you may pay your ticket at the Circuit Clerk's office on the first floor of the courthouse. Simply check the appropriate box on the back of your ticket and turn it in to the Circuit Clerk.
     
  • I received a no insurance ticket, but I was insured at the date of the ticket.
      If you have proof that the vehicle you were driving was insured on the day you got your ticket, simply show that proof at the State's Attorney's office prior to the court date, or bring the proof to the court on the court date and the ticket will be dismissed.
     
  • Will this ticket suspend my drivers license?
      Your drivers license status is something decided entirely by the Illinois Secretary of State. The Clark County State's Attorney's office is not involved in issuing drivers licenses, or suspending them. Direct questions in this regard to the Secretary of State's office at 1-800-252-8980
     
  • I cannot come to court on the date on my ticket. How can I reschedule?
      All court dates are set by the judge who presides over traffic court. In order to reschedule your court date, you will need to file a motion to continue and have that motion granted by the judge before the date you are trying to change, there is no guarantee the motion may be granted.
     
  • I missed my court date, what will happen now?
      It is important to be present at all required court dates. If you fail to appear, several things can happen. If the ticket is for a minor offense, the Court will usually enter a judgment against you, just as if you had pled guilty. You will be responsible for any fines assessed by the court.
      In the cases of misdemeanor or felony, if you fail to appear for court, the judge may issue a warrant for your arrest. Any bond you have previously posted may be ordered forfeited.